Saturday, November 22, 2008

Weaver Birds at Die Oog


Just thought I would share this photo with you. Recently, my painting group visited a tiny nature reserve in the heart of Cape Town’s suburbia, called “Die Oog”, (The Eye). This tiny patch of wetland is preserved by the local residents and has become home to many species of birds. It is almost too beautiful to paint!
I was watching a few Weaver birds building their nests in a Willow tree, over the water. These little birds were so industrious, coming back and forth with bits of foliage in their beaks, sewing the bits into their beautifully created homes. I caught these two neighbours stopping for a break and chat. I do wonder what they were saying to each other, the conversation was very animated.
These birds build apartment-like nests, often 100 to 300 in a single tree, often over water for protection. The male builds the nest and tries to entice the female with his wonderfull building skills.

6 comments:

Suzanne McDermott said...

I've never seen these birds or their nests - Fantastic! Thank you!

Dianne McNaughton said...

Hi Suzanne,
Apparently they are found in Southern Africa, Australia and some parts of Asia. I have added a link and a few words about their nest building abilities. The tree was full of hundreds of Weaver nests.

Carol said...

Beautiful photograph Di This must be one of Cape Town's best kept secrets! What a magnificent place to paint! What did you paint, or was it just too overwhelmingly beautiful?

Dianne McNaughton said...

Hi Carol, this place is magic! I painted a water scene in a realistic manner and it just looks chocolate boxy so will probably paint over it! Sometimes a beautiful scene is just too beautiful to paint!

marianne said...

I have seen these birds in Johannesburg and in Entebbe. They are fascinating!
Thanks for this lovely picture!

wolfsbirding said...

Hi, There is not quite hundreds of nests and weavers in this tree, although it seems like it. There are two types of Weavers that vie for this space. They are Cape Weavers as well as Masked Weavers. Those two were probably trying to outdo each other by getting to build the best looking nest to impress the female who anyway 90% of the time goes and rips the nest to shreds.Hi, There is not quite hundreds of nests and weavers in this tree, although it seems like it. There are two types of Weavers that vie for this space. They are Cape Weavers as well as Masked Weavers. Those two were probably trying to outdo each other by getting to build the best looking nest to impress the female who anyway 90% of the time goes and rips the nest to shreds.